Christmas Trees

We love that fresh-cut Christmas tree smell during the holidays, and are proud to sell a great selection of premium trees that are grown with care in Wisconsin. Our trees are on full display so you can see exactly what you’re getting. This means you can determine (rather than guess, as with pre-bundled trees) which individual tree will look best in your living room, and then imagine how it will look when it’s decorated with lights and ornaments!

BALSAM FIR  Abies balsamea
Pyramid shape. 1/2″ to 1″ short, flat, long lasting needles that are rounded at the tip; nice, dark green color with silvery cast and fragrance. Named for the balsam or resin found in blisters on bark. Resin is used to make microscope slides and was sold like chewing gum; used to treat wounds in Civil War. This fragrant tree is popular in Canada and throughout the northern United States.

FRASER FIR  Abies fraseri 
Pyramid shape. The strong, upward-turned branches are densely covered with two-tone needles. The top side of the needle is dark-green to dark blue-green in color and the bottom side has a silvery appearance. Excellent needle retention, a pleasant aroma, and its color make this one of the most popular Christmas tree species. Heavy ornaments and lights are easily held by this strong tree. The branches are also used to make wreaths, swags and Christmas roping. Named for a botanist, John Fraser, who explored the southern Appalachians in the late 1700’s.

BLUE SPRUCE (Picea pungens)
Used as an ornamental landscape tree, the Colorado Blue Spruce makes an excellent Christmas tree. Dark green to powdery blue; very stiff needles, 1″ to 1-1/2″ long; good form; will drop needles in a warm room; symmetrical; but is best among species for needle retention; branches are stiff and will support many heavy decorations.
 
WHITE PINE  Pinus strobes 
Impressive cone shape. The soft needles are blue-green to silvery-green in color and has a very full appearance. Heavy ornaments do not work well on this tree. This tree has very little fragrance and is reported to be less of an allergen than some of the more fragrant trees.
 
SCOTCH PINE  Pinus sylvestris
Stiff branches; stiff, dark green needles one inch long; holds needles for four weeks; needles will stay on even when dry; introduced into United States by European settlers.